Archive for the ‘economics’ Category

Why I Left Goldman Sachs By Greg Smith

Here’s a review, by Philip Mause, of Greg Smith’s book, Why I Left Goldman Sachs

The link to the review is here: Book Review: Why I Left Goldman Sachs By Greg Smith

Mause’s bottom line:

Greg Smith’s book is a good read and provides some useful insight into Wall Street trading operations. … But to the extent that it purports to be a detailed indictment of Goldman Sachs, the book falls short.

You can buy the book on Amazon, by clicking here: Why I Left Goldman Sachs
(As always, no endorsement is implied.)

SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed

Here’s a review, by David Willetts , of Martin Nowak and Roger Highfield’s book, SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed

The link to the review is here: The invisible hand that binds us all

Willetts’s bottom line:

Like other great controversialists, Mr Nowak moves from decision matrices to emotive moral language. He says the best strategy is to be hopeful, generous and forgiving. Hopeful means you first try co-operation – your opening move should be positive. Generous means not to be as concerned where you are relative to others as to obscure your own gains from interaction even if they are more modest. Forgiving means if someone else defects, you do not defect straightaway but try to re-establish co-operation, not least because it could have been an accidental mistake.

We cannot just offer freedom, opportunity and choice without also recognising the power of belonging, commitment and roots. But all politicians can draw inspiration and ideas from the intellectual resources of this exciting approach.

You can buy the book on Amazon, by clicking here: SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed
(As always, no endorsement is implied.)

Economics of Good & Evil

Here’s a review, by Nancy Koenh, of Tomas Sedlacek’s book, Economics of Good & Evil

The link to the review is here: The Moral Behind All the Numbers

Koehn’s bottom line:

In many respects, the author has offered up a set of musings, many of which are energetic and enlightening in their appeal to the humanities. But the work’s contributions do not come cheap. Readers have to endure not only the absence of direction and analytic argument, but also frequent redundancies and narrative switchbacks. It all adds up to a worthy but exhausting journey.

You can buy the book on Amazon, by clicking here: Economics of Good & Evil
(As always, no endorsement is implied.)

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