Archive for the ‘Business Ethics’ Category

Why I Left Goldman Sachs By Greg Smith

Here’s a review, by Philip Mause, of Greg Smith’s book, Why I Left Goldman Sachs

The link to the review is here: Book Review: Why I Left Goldman Sachs By Greg Smith

Mause’s bottom line:

Greg Smith’s book is a good read and provides some useful insight into Wall Street trading operations. … But to the extent that it purports to be a detailed indictment of Goldman Sachs, the book falls short.

You can buy the book on Amazon, by clicking here: Why I Left Goldman Sachs
(As always, no endorsement is implied.)

SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed

Here’s a review, by David Willetts , of Martin Nowak and Roger Highfield’s book, SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed

The link to the review is here: The invisible hand that binds us all

Willetts’s bottom line:

Like other great controversialists, Mr Nowak moves from decision matrices to emotive moral language. He says the best strategy is to be hopeful, generous and forgiving. Hopeful means you first try co-operation – your opening move should be positive. Generous means not to be as concerned where you are relative to others as to obscure your own gains from interaction even if they are more modest. Forgiving means if someone else defects, you do not defect straightaway but try to re-establish co-operation, not least because it could have been an accidental mistake.

We cannot just offer freedom, opportunity and choice without also recognising the power of belonging, commitment and roots. But all politicians can draw inspiration and ideas from the intellectual resources of this exciting approach.

You can buy the book on Amazon, by clicking here: SuperCooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed
(As always, no endorsement is implied.)

Chasing Madoff

Here’s a review I wrote of the film, Chasing Madoff. (The movie is about Harry Markopolos, the whistle-blower who tried for nearly a decade to bring down Bernie Madoff.)

The movie is based largely on Markopolos’s own book, No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller

You can buy the book on Amazon, by clicking here: No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller
(As always, no endorsement is implied.)

Managing for Stakeholders

Here’s a summary of a feature-length review that I wrote of Managing for Stakeholders: Survival, Reputation, Success (2007), by R. Edward Freeman, Jeffrey S. Harrison, and Andrew C. Wicks.

It’s a book that, despite some admirable ambitions, unfortunately doesn’t deliver on its promises.

The summary is posted on my Business Ethics blog. See: Managing for Stakeholders (Book Review)

Guide to Business Ethics

Here’s a review, by Jeremy Thorn, of Sally Bibb’s book, The Right Thing – an everyday guide to ethics in business

The link to the review is here: The Right Thing – an everyday guide to ethics in business

Thorn’s bottom line:

Throughout this book, which is a model of clarity without any preaching, there are examples of many of the ethical dilemmas we might face, in recruitment, working with and managing others, in appraisals and in commerce. It should be read by anyone in work, and I suggest, often re-read.

You can buy the book on Amazon, by clicking here: The Right Thing – an everyday guide to ethics in business
(As always, no endorsement is implied.)

Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics

Here’s a review of an really good new reference volume: “The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics, Reviewed by Matt Zwolinski”.

I’ll admit right away that I’m biased: I’m co-author of a chapter in the Handbook (the chapter on Conflict of Interest) and Matt has nice things to say about our chapter in his review. But this really is a useful volume for anyone with a serious interest in this field.

Matt’s bottom line:

…if the editors’ goal was to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of business ethics, with all the diversity and disagreement that exists in that field, there is no doubt that they have succeed admirably.

You can buy the Handbook via Amazon, here: Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics.